Flute Fingering Chart

Aug 08, 2018

On this page, you'll find:

  • An easy-to-read fingering chart for flute
  • A quick WALK-THROUGH video, showing you EXACTLY where to put your fingers on the flute

And as a bonus, you'll learn:

  • How to AVOID the 4 REALLY common MISTAKESbeginner flute players make when reading a fingering chart

Why a Fingering Chart is so Critical When Learning the Flute?  

Having a flute fingering chart is one of the most critical steps in learning how to become a top-notch flutist; however, many beginning flute players seem to be averse to using one, and there are several reasons why they might be this way. For one, many beginning flute players see it as an obvious mark of their inexperience, and honestly, that sentiment is quite true—you’re not going to see the principal flutist of the New

 

 A flute fingering chart shows you exactly how to play each note.York Philharmonic breaking out a flute fingering chart in the middle of a performance. However, this is not something that the beginning flutist should be ashamed of—everyone is a beginner at some point, and that shouldn’t be embarrassing for the player. However, what is embarrassing is a flute player that doesn’t know the correct fingerings because they refuse to consult a fingering chart. Another reason that students might avoid flute fingering charts is because they can be difficult to decipher. If you’re unfamiliar with the symbols and representations used in a fingering chart, then it can undoubtedly seem like more trouble than it’s worth. However, this doesn’t mean that you should give up on flute fingering charts altogether, though. It simply means that you need to find one that you can understand. Here are some tips on finding a flute fingering chart that will work for you:

This short video shows how to quickly start reading a flute fingering chart...

TIP #1: Find one that is large enough to quickly and easily read. There are lots (and I mean lots) of notes to learn on the flute, and when publishers try to cram them all on one page of a flute fingering chart, this can result in a lot of wasted practice time spent squinting and wondering if you’re pressing the right keys. TIP #2: Find a pictographic flute fingering chart. Many times charts will use numbers or nondescript circles to indicate which keys must be pressed, but for the beginner flute this can prove confusing and time consuming. Instead, find a fingering chart that resembles an actual flute, with the keys running horizontally and shaped like they really are on the flute. This is a real time saver when it comes to “decoding” what the fingering chart is trying to get you to do. TIP #3: Find a fingering chart that works with your particular flute. Not all flutes are created equal—some brands produce instruments or instrument models that include additional keys not traditionally found on flutes (such as the B key or the gizmo key). If you’re playing a flute that lacks these keys but using a flute fingering chart that takes them into account, than some of the notes you try to produce will probably not work for you. Similarly, if your flute does have those keys but you’re using a chart that doesn’t take them into account, then you’re missing out on utilizing the full potential of your instrument.

Why Use a Flute Fingering Chart? 

The use of a flute fingering chart is essential to the development of a good beginning flute student for several reasons. For one, there are simply too many notes on the flute to remember right off the bat. A typical flute will have a range of about thirty notes, and it could take months or even years to get all of them solidly planted in your memory. While at least some notes on the flute are relatively easy to intuit (since lots of times you’re simply lifting up a finger to play a note higher than the one before it), not all of them are and will require awkward and non-logical fingering combinations, especially in the upper register. Secondly, a flute fingering chart is essential because of alternate fingerings. Like most instruments, it is possible to play identical notes on the flute by using different fingering combinations—for example, the multiple fingerings available for Bb/A# in the first and second registers. These alternate fingerings are used because within certain contexts (key signatures, note combinations, etc.) the primary fingerings either feel awkward or are impossible to execute. So in reality there is nothing “alternate” or optional about these fingerings—they are just as important and necessary as all the rest. Using a good flute fingering chart that provides you with these alternate fingerings will allow you to quickly and easily make changes to the fingerings you use in passages that feel difficult to execute.

 

A Word of Caution

While there is no doubt that a quality flute fingering chart is vitally important for the beginning flute player, if it’s used for too long it becomes a burdensome crutch. If you’ve been playing the flute for a while and are still having to refer back to your fingering chart every few notes, then that’s a good indication that you’re not putting enough effort into actually memorizing those notes. While the flute fingering chart is a great help, it’s still something that you’re going to have to lessen your dependence on eventually. If you aim to learn (and really memorize!) two to three notes each week, then you’ll find that your flute fingering chart becomes something that you have to pull out less and less as you progress. It will still be a great resource for alternate fingerings and double checking those notes that you’re not called on to play often, but it will no longer be something you’ve got to devote yourself to full time.

Get your free easy-to-read flute fingering chart on this page. It's valued at $12.95 and is a great way to kick-start your playing!

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